Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Manchild in the Promised Land Essay

The majority of Negroes during the time of Douglass and Washington spent their lives in the fields, gutters, and ghettoes of America. They continue to do so today. Two recently published autobiographies clearly indicate that Negro degradation and deprivation are confined neither to the South nor to earlier times. Claude Brown provides dramatic accounts of life in urban Negro slums. Both are highly readable, although Williamson’s seems less complete and less authentic. Brown tells the story of â€Å"Sonny,† a Harlem â€Å"corner boy† who went to college. His childhood and adolescence included chronic truancy, prolonged friction with his parents, gang fighting and assorted delinquencies. Sonny was intimate with personal danger and suffered severe bodily harm. He was well known to the courts and the youth correctional houses. Although Sonny’s childhood and adolescence appear to have been those of many Harlem youth, he was spared the fate of many of his friends: violent death, permanent body injury, demoralization, and fanaticism. Claude Brown’s account of his experiences growing up in Harlem in the 1950’s indicates it may be equally prevalent in a metropolitan setting. One of Brown’s friends 1965: 425) asserts: The time I did in Woodburn, the times I did on the Rock, that was college man . . . Every time I went there, I learned a little more. When I go to jail now, Sonny, I live, man. I’m right at home. That’s the good part about it . . . Now when I go back to the joint, anywhere I go, I know some people. If I go to any of the jails in New York, or if I do a slam in Jersey even, I still run into a lot of cats I know. It’s almost like a family. (425) For Brown and many of the revolutionaries, the slogan of black power seemed to have this content: †¢ Negroes, by themselves, must assert their political and economic power through such methods as the creation of all-Negro political parties such as the Black Panther Party. Coalition with whites is either impossible or undesirable, for it would undermine Negro dignity. Integration with whites should not be a paramount goal. Rather, Negroes should strengthen their own separate culture and society: â€Å"black is beautiful. † At some future date, if a Negro so chooses, he might integrate with whites. Negroes must affirm their unique identity, learn of their African heritage, and identify with the â€Å"colored† peoples throughout the world. White society is both oppressive and decadent. Negroes should not fight â€Å"the white man’s war† in places such as Vietnam. Violence, at least in self-defense, can and should be used by Negroes to achieve their goals. While Negroes are a minority in America, they can count on the support of Asian and African peoples. American man is now an urban man and he was recently a rural man. It would be strange if the psychological shock of trying to find streets as natural as fields or woods did not provoke savage explosions in the cities. Claude Brown’s brilliant examination of Harlem, Manchild in the Promised Land, showed just how much of the black ghetto’s barbarism came from the sudden transplantation of sharecroppers from shacks to tenements. Robert Kennedy was using more than a politician’s rhetoric when he stated before his murder: ‘We confront an urban wilderness more formidable and resistant and in some ways more frightening than the wilderness faced by the Pilgrims or the pioneers. ‘ Being labeled a troublemaker is a danger of growing up in suburbia as well as in the slums, but the suburbs are more likely to provide parental intervention and psychiatrists, pastors, family counselors to help the youth abandon his undesirable identity. It is much harder for the inner-city youth to find alternatives to a rebel role. Thus it is in the slums that youth gangs are most likely to drift from minor and haphazard into serious, repeated, purposeful delinquency. It is in the slums, too, that young people are most likely to be exposed to the example of the successful career criminal as a person of prestige in the community. To a population denied access to traditional positions of status and achievement, a successful criminal may be a highly visible model of power and affluence and a center of training and recruitment for criminal enterprise. As Ward (1998) describes it: Among the social institutions which delineated black urban associational life, the one most closely related to the vocal group was the street gang. Sometimes the groups and the gangs even shared the same membership. In Baltimore, Johnny Page of the Marylanders doubled as a member of the Dungaree Boys gang, while Julius Williams had dual affiliations as a battling member of the Shakers and as a balladeer with the Royal Jokers in Detroit. â€Å"Julius Williams was the terror of the school†, recalled his classmate Woodie King. â€Å"He was sixteen. He enjoyed fighting teachers and singing in class†. When Claude Brown returned from a juvenile detention centre in upstate New York in the early 1950s, he noticed that many of the old gangs from his Harlem neighbourhood had turned to doowopping in the wake of the Orioles’ inspirational rise from a Baltimore street corner, via an appearance on Arthur Godfrey’s CBS radio show Talent Scouts, to national celebrity (Ward 59) One of the most consistent patterns of emotional concern expressed by the disadvantaged child is for potency or power. His heroes are the strong, invincible men, such as Hercules or Superman. We could speculate that the interest in Greek mythology expressed by disadvantaged pupils is also related to this concern. As a result, we would like to see the schools investigate, with the children, the power concept. This is a possible study topic for even the earliest grades. Can people be strong in ways other than physical strength? The teacher might begin by asking the youngsters who their neighborhood heroes are–who are the â€Å"top cats† on their block–and then asking why they are so. We would guess that the responses will probably be in terms of physical strength. The objective then, would be to help the class begin to explore other routes of power. Staging points for such discussions might be derived from reading excerpts from the powerful autobiography of Claude Brown, Manchild in the Promised Land, the author’s experiences growing up in Harlem. 6 The most direct method, however, to help children feel greater potency is to let them experience it. A way that combines such experience with the improvement of writing skills was demonstrated by one of our teaching interns. In a seventh-grade English class, required by the curriculum guide to study paragraph skills, the teaching intern asked the class, â€Å"How many of you can remember any of the things you had to read in school when you were in the third grade? † Some hands went up, and names of books were reported. â€Å"How did you like them? † Claude Brown’s memories of post-war Harlem churches similarly stressed their extra-religious appeal. He attended one simply because he lusted after the preacher’s daughter and fondly recalled Father Divine’s 155th Street Mission, not for its spiritual nourishment, but because he could get all the food he could eat there for 15 cents. Brown also appreciated that the black churches of Harlem were commercial, as well as religious, enterprises. At Mrs Rogers’ storefront church, he recalled, â€Å"people jumped up and down until they got knocked down by the spirit, and Mrs Rogers put bowls of money on a kitchen table and kept pointing to it and asking for more†. (27-8) Works Cited Brown, Claude. Manchild in the Promised Land. New York: Macmillan, 1965. A youthful autobiographical account of modern life in a black ghetto of New York Bukowczyk, John J. â€Å"†Who Is the Nation? â€Å"-Or, â€Å"Did Cleopatra Have Red Hair? â€Å": A Patriotic Discourse on Diversity, Nationality, and Race. † MELUS 23. 4 (1998) Corbould, Clare. â€Å"Streets, Sounds and Identity in Interwar Harlem. † Journal of Social History 40. 4 (2007) Koelling, Holly. Classic Connections: Turning Teens on to Great Literature. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2004 Nelson, Emmanuel S. African American Authors, 1745-1945 A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000. Nelson, Emmanuel S. , ed. African American Autobiographers: A Sourcebook. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2002. Sampson, Benjamin W. â€Å"Season Preview 2004-05: A Comprehensive Listing of Productions, Dates and Directors at TCG Theatres Nationwide. † American Theatre Oct. 2004 Shafton, Anthony. Dream-Singers: The African American Way with Dreams. New York: Wiley, 2002. Sixty Years of Great Books by African-Americans. † Ebony Nov. 2005 Ward, Brian. Just My Soul Responding: Rhythm and Blues, Black Consciousness, and Race Relations. London: UCL Press, 1998.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Elements of Informed Consent in Medical Ethics - 997 Words

Elements of informed Consent Consent can be defined as permission granted by a person legally capable does so, to receive medical treatment. Medical, legal, psychological, regulatory and philosophical literatures have tried to analyze informed consent in terms of its elements. Some elements have been identified as fundamental to the concept; they include comprehension, voluntariness, disclosure, competence and consent. These elements imply that a person gives and informed consent if the person is competent to act, receives thorough disclosure about the procedure, comprehends the disclosed information, acts voluntarily and consents. In the case of Planned Parenthood of Central Missouri v Danforth; the court gave a definition of informed consent as; the giving the patient information regarding what would be done, and the consequences. This implies that the most essential element of consent is disclosure. A person can make an informed consent in the substantial absence of control by oth ers. Informed consent can legally mean effective approval given by a subject or patient. Informed consent is a fundamentally matter of protecting and enabling autonomous or self- determining choice. The doctrine of informed consent provides that it is the providers duty, to explain and give information to the patient, which enables the patient to evaluate a proposed medical procedure before submitting to it. Therefore, consent is called informed because it satisfies institutional and legalShow MoreRelatedAn Evaluation Of An Informed Consent974 Words   |  4 PagesAn informed consent is the sovereign act by the patient or a research subject to authorize a healthcare professional to perform a medical procedure. It means that patients must be briefed on all the goals of the procedure, the methods to be used by the physician and all the risks that they might be subjected to while undergoing therapies/treatments. De Bord (2014), defines informed consent as â€Å"Informed consent is th e process by which the treating health care provider discloses appropriate informationRead MoreEthical Issues Involved in Obtaining Consent for Treatment Essay1047 Words   |  5 Pagesin Obtaining Consent for Treatment Medical consent is the act, in healthcare, of informing patients of disease processes, its natural history and treatments or observation of such. Consent involves competing values of patient autonomy versus provider paternalism and much of the ethical controversy resides here. Consent is commonly written, but may be oral or implied, and is often supported with decision aids such as written materials, videos, etc. The ethics of medical consent requires a greaterRead MoreThe Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks highlights how ethically flawed medicine once was and perhaps800 Words   |  4 PagesThe Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks highlights how ethically flawed medicine once was and perhaps still is. It tells the devastating story of a woman whose cells were collected and cultured without her consent and its wondrous effect within the medical community as well as the equally distressing effect on her family. Preceding the 50s, scientists, specifically Dr. George Otto Gey have been trying without success to cultivate human cells in laboratories for decades. Henrietta Lacks was an AfricanRead MoreLegal And Ethical Issues Of Medical Consent1559 Words   |  7 PagesAustralia it is a requirement for a person to give consent when receiving any medical treatment. Whether it be consent by an adult on behalf of a minor or an adult consenting for themselves. This concept appears to be quite candid; how ever when faced with a complex and challenging situation, it becomes difficult to distinguish the validity of the individual’s consent. The case Re Bruce [2015] will explore the legal and ethical issues of medical consent in exceptional circumstances. The examination ofRead MoreEthical Principles Of The Tuskegee Study1665 Words   |  7 Pagesbeing unlawfully treated when involved in any type of treatment, research study, or medical decision-making. Miss Evers’ Boys provide examples, to how ethical principles were neglected to be used throughout the study. The Tuskegee study lasted a brutal 40 years and ethical principles where pushed aside, to obtain the evolution of syphilis in African American males. Anyone who is involved in some type of medical treatment or research deserves to be treated with respect and dignity. As healthcareRead MoreThe Legal And Ethical Issues1532 Words   |  7 Pageswill address the Legal and Ethical issues in relation to the case study. It will outline the four elements of valid consent and applicable issues needed to prove and defend the claim for all parties involved. The Universal declaration of bioethics and human rights identifies three relevant principles to this case study. Beneficence and non-maleficent, the notion of proper free and informed consent, autonomy and the measure in place to protect individuals not capable of exerting this right. FinallyRead MoreEssay on Informed Consent, Refusal, and Competence1382 Words   |  6 Pages In the medical field today, whenever a procedure is going to be done on a patient, informed consent must be given to the doctor from the patient prior the procedure taking place. Informed consent is t he approval given by the patient to the doctor for treatment. In the case being discussed today, an 80 year old patient, with a history of congestive heart failure, is in the doctors office complaining of chest pains. After an examination, the doctor believes the best course of treatment wouldRead MoreThe Advantages and Disadvantages of Medical/Nursing Research and Identify Associated Dilemmas, Analyze the History of Ethics and Research, and Identify Areas of Conflict Between Research and Ethics1102 Words   |  5 PagesEthics and Research Paper Brandi McCord University of Phoenix (online) In my paper I plan to address the advantages and disadvantages of medical/nursing research and Identify associated dilemmas, analyze the history of ethics and research, and identify areas of conflict between research and ethics. Ethics is defined as the rules or standards governing the conduct of a person or the member of a profession. Research is defined as any gathering of data, information and facts for the advancementRead MoreEthical Principles in the Medical Field1063 Words   |  4 PagesMedical Ethics Patients should be treated with respect and politely since they are in a fragile state and more so, they have their own right as an individual. It is the duty of a caregiver or anyone responsible for his /her health to do anything in order to promote the patients health. Therefore, it is wrong for somebody taking care of a patient, to burden or impose strenuous activities on him/her. In this case, the first thing to do after learning of the events which has taken place in you absenceRead MoreCJHS430 Essays634 Words   |  3 Pagesï » ¿ Informed Consent Paper CJHS/430 - COLLABORATIVE SERVICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE This Paper focuses on the relationship between informed consent and the requirements of human service workers in the State of Washington. Informed consent is a legal procedure to ensure that a patient, client, and research participants are aware of all the potential risks and costs involved in a treatment or procedure. The elements of informed consent include informing the client of the nature of the treatment

Monday, December 30, 2019

University of Phoenix Nursing 5 Characteristics That Made Florence Nightingale Into a Nursing Legacy 2019

Often called the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingales legacy continues today. University of Phoenix nursing students are learning to emulate her pioneering ways. Contemporary nurses have much to gain by following the five key characteristics that made Florence Nightingale a success: 1. Purpose in Nursing Early in her career, Nightingale described a divine calling. Her resolve to care for patients carried her through difficult times. Having a purpose is crucial for todays University of Phoenix nursing graduates when dealing with long shifts and busy days. 2. Nursing Study Nightingale began her career by observing deaconesses at a Kaiserswerth, Germany hospital. She later completed four months of formal training at the hospital. A strong educational foundation is helping current University of Phoenix nursing graduates compete for the best nursing jobs. 3. Modern Nursing Attitude During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale led a group of female nurses to a British war field hospital. At the time, this was a bold move, as women had never served in wartime hospitals. The modern field of nursing is continually changing. University of Phoenix nursing graduates are constantly looking for ways to improve their profession. .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#eaeaea; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #34495E!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db:active, .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:inherit; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db .post Title { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .u0ef0b74107e03cb02c7bfe49b36544db:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } READ Lets Thank IT For Our Health Care Advances4. Nursing Advocate Nightingale convinced stubborn army officials to change poor hospital conditions. As sanitation improved, death rates decreased. Some University of Phoenix nursing graduates are choosing to continue Nightingales legacy by becoming patient advocates or lobbyists. 5. Persistence in Nursing Nightingale cared for British soldiers with unending determination. Her untiring efforts earned her the nickname Lady with the Lamp. Today, University of Phoenix nursing alumni who have persistence, often rise to be leaders in their chosen specialty. Students are combining University of Phoenix online registered nursing programs with campus-based programs throughout the U.S. Prospective students may request additional information from the University of Phoenix Nursing School by filling out their information request form at College-Pages.com. Related ArticlesRN to BSN Degree Labor and Delivery Nurses Care for Women, Families, and NewbornsBSN Top 5 Reasons to Earn a Bachelor of Science in NursingBusiness Associate Degree Single Moms Prefer University of Phoenix Online ProgramsLPN RN Online Program Combine Business and Nursing for Advanced Career OpportunitiesMaine Colleges and Universities Pursuing Online and Campus-based Education in Maine, the Pine Tree StateOnline Degree Options in Health Care .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac8943d5 { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#eaeaea; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #34495E!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac8943d5:active, .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac89 43d5:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac8943d5 { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac8943d5 .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:inherit; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac8943d5 .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .u32200e2ee66caa779b369fdbac8943d5:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } READ BSN Top 5 Reasons to Earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Saturday, December 21, 2019

Effects Of Violent Video Games Essay - 1712 Words

Out of all of the age groups, teeneagers love video games. Though some say â€Å"it’s just a game†, that simple game could be more of an impact than people think. At the moment teenagers may not see any change in their actions and emotions while playing video games. Violent video games in specific are a huge impact on Americans teenagers. Do parents actually pay attention to the things their children say while playing violent video games? No. Violent video games affect a great amount of America’s teenagers, it causes hostility, aggression and affects school performance. People ages 13-19 are usually classified as adolescents also know as teenagers. Adolescents are usually the most influenced in most American societies. In†¦show more content†¦The violence in video games is not always noticeable to most adults or more specifically the â€Å"non-gamers†. While the graphics in a violent video game are better and more realistic than a general user vid eo game its more tempting to play. Teenagers seem to be aggressive already at moments because of puberty and other teenage life problems, but, there are other reasons they are very aggressive â€Å"out of nowhere†. The aggression really comes from the teenagers environment and/or the violence in the video games they play. Kirsh stated that adolescents tend to play violent video games in their development stage, which could cause them to respond to provocative situations with the greatest aggression. (Kirsh 383) With teens going through their stages of development they could think that the video games that they’re playing frequently are normal ways of life. For example the actions they see on the violent video games may later be seen be seen as ordinary actions for the adolescent. The teenagers that play the most violent video games are most likely to be more aggressive. Being in an online lobby on a violent video game there is plenty of verbal aggression. The amount o f explicit language used against players when playing with strangers on violent video games is over the top. Players that use the explicit language against the players usually believe theyShow MoreRelatedThe Effects of Violent Video Games Essay1685 Words   |  7 Pages Since violent video games, like Mortal Kombat, were created, adolescents who play these games become more aggressive than before. To me, playing violent video games is unsafe for these people since they have the negative influence on these people. I believe that researching on that topic would help us get the sense of what problems to avoid. I wish to know what are the possible effects of violent video games on adolescents’ aggression. The independent variable is violent video games, and theRead MoreEffects of Violent Video Games Essay1406 Words   |  6 PagesRhetorical Analysis Essay According to the article â€Å"Shooting in the Dark† author, Benedict Carey, states that studies today on violent video games show no concrete evidence on actually long term negative effects on gamers. Mr. Carey is not a researcher or scientist but is a veteran writer of neuroscience, neurology, and psychology. Throughout this article he gives factual evidence and quotes from scholarly sources such as doctors and researchers in the fields of behavior and psychology. The authorRead MoreEssay on The Negative Effects of Violent Video Games1529 Words   |  7 Pagesor what inspired these attacks on these innocent victims? This question has become an epidemic in our country. We live in a violent world and young people have easy access to it whether its on television, in music or on the Internet. But with the explosion of media entertainment in recent years, video games have come under scrutiny as to whether or not violence in video games numbs children and teens to the consequenc es of real-life violence. The answer to this question is yes. Young children andRead MoreGame over: the Effects of Violent Video Games on Children Essay1416 Words   |  6 PagesGame Over: The effects of Violent Video Games on Children Seven hours. That is the amount of hours a day the average American child plays a video games (Anderson 354), and with technology advancing and games becoming more graphic, the concern over a violent game’s effect over a child’s development is growing. What does playing video games for seven hours do to a child’s development? Violent, role-playing video games adversely affects a child’s development and causes aggression in children and adolescents;Read More Negative Effects of Violent Video Games on Teenagers Essay1280 Words   |  6 Pages Video games have been available to consumers for the last 30 years. They are a unique form of entertainment, because they encourage players to become a part of the games script. Todays sophisticated video games require players to pay constant attention to the game, rather than passively watching a movie. My working thesis is â€Å" Although there are other factors that can lead to violent behaviors such as inner stres s, playing violent video games are one of the main factors that can lead to violentRead MoreEffects of Violent Video Games on Children Essay1660 Words   |  7 PagesEffects of Violent Video Games on Children The use of video games has become tremendously popular among children and adolescents in the past decade. In fact, â€Å"Sixty-eight percent of U.S. households play computer or video games.† (David Jenkins, 2009) This statistic reveals how important it is to understand the effects that these games can have on individuals and more specifically, children. Over the years, numerous studies have been conducted investigating whether video games have positiveRead MoreThe Negative Effects of Violent Video Games Essays1274 Words   |  6 Pagessociety, and technology. All of these improvements have brought with them positive effects. Warfare has allowed oppressed people to rule themselves; medicine has saved countless lives with vaccines and treatment programs; education of societies has allowed people to make their dreams come true; and, advancements in technology have made the previous three possible. With these positive effects also come negative effects, which are seen on a gr and scale. Advancement in warfare has caused numerous deathsRead MoreThe Effects of Violent Video Games on Society Essay2542 Words   |  11 Pagesshootings were the perpetrators were avid players of violent video games and had refused to participate in any disciplined activity or sport at school (Grossman, Christensen, 2004). Although these are considered high-profile cases, the exact number of murders and assaults committed by players of violent video games is unknown; however, because the correlation between the two has become so compelling, the FBI has listed â€Å"playing violent video games† in a category of behaviors associated with schoolRead MoreEssay on The Negative Effects of Violent Video Games1892 Words   |  8 Pages Video games have been a rapidly expanding industry since their inception in the 1970s. Along with their growth have come concerns about violent video games and their effects on aggression and violence in young people. The many school shootings have pushed this issue to the forefront, since the two shooters were avid players of video games. These events brought about the question: do violent video games induce aggression in youth? That’s the question I set out to answer by looking at researchRead MoreEssay on The Negative Effects of Violent Video Games on Children1990 Words   |  8 Pagesâ€Å"Life is a video game. No matter how good you get, you are always zapped in the end† (â€Å"Video Game Quotes† 1). Over time researchers, psychiatrists, and parents have often wondered how damaging violent video games can be to the youth in society. This is an important matter to people with children in their personal lives or work environment. These games have bec ome a large risk factor for aggressive behavior in children. Researchers have been saying that video games do affect adults as well; however

Friday, December 13, 2019

Evolution Lab Free Essays

Evolution Lab The finches on Darwin and Wallace Islands feed on seeds produced by plants growing on these islands. There are three categories of seeds: soft seeds, produced by plants that do well under wet conditions; seeds that are intermediate in hardness, produced by plants that do best under moderate precipitation; and hard seeds, produced by plants that dominate in drought conditions. The lab is based on a model for the evolution of quantitative traits-characteristics of an individual that are controlled by large numbers of genes. We will write a custom essay sample on Evolution Lab or any similar topic only for you Order Now These traits are studied by looking at the statistical distribution of the trait in populations and investigating how the distribution changes from one generation to the next. For the finches in Evolution Lab, the depth of the beak is the quantitative trait. I investigated how this trait changes under different biological and environmental conditions. I manipulated various biological parameters (initial mean beak size, heritability of beak size, variation in beak size, fitness, and clutch size) and one environmental parameter (precipitation) of the system, and observed changes in the distributions of beak size and population numbers over time. Assignment 2: The Influence of Precipitation on Beak Size and Population Number The first experiment is designed to study the influence of beak size on finch population numbers. For finches, deep beaks are strong beaks, ideally suited for cracking hard seeds, and shallow beaks are better suited for cracking soft seeds. I experimented first with the finches’ adaptation and evolution of their population over 300 years, and changed the Wallace birds beak size to 28mm, and Darwin’s birds stayed at the default of 12mm. I hypothesize a since there are more hard seeds (64%) on the islands than soft seeds (4%). The birds with the smaller beak (Darwin) will not be able to get enough food which may cause some of the birds to die, resulting in a decrease in the smaller beak bird’s population and an increase in the larger beak (Wallace) birds population because of the larger beak size better able to eat hard seeds. Darwin: Red Wallace: Blue I observed that the Darwin birds (smaller beak) actually grew up to about 25mm, as well as the Darwin bird’s population grew over time. The Wallace bird’s beak stayed the same as well as the population stayed steady but grew. The data actually refutes my hypothesis because I didn’t expect the smaller beak sized birds to grow to adapt to the seeds, I expected them to die off. This next experiment is designed to explore the effect of precipitation on finch beak size and population numbers. The experiment was to see how a decrease in precipitation on Darwin Island might affect beak size and how a decrease in precipitation might influence population numbers for these finches over time. I hypothesize a decrease in rain will produce more hard seeds because the hard seeds favor drought conditions, while the other seeds will not increase. And the decrease in rain may only slightly cause the finch population to decrease at first, but then will increase and stay steady as the birds have time to adapt to the drought conditions and their beaks will evolve. I observed that the beak sized for Darwin’s birds supported my hypothesis in that the birds beak sized increased with time. And the population did what I thought too, in that it decreased at first and then increased steadily. I then ran another experiment for 200 and 300 years separately. I observed that the 200 years population and beaks did about the same as the 100 year experiment. Which still confirm my hypothesis. But the 300 years, the bird’s populations and beaks sizes on both islands increased, but that the Darwin birds eventually passed Wallace’s birds in population and beak sized. I then performed the same experiment for both Wallace Island and Darwin Island simultaneously. I noticed that the 100 and 200 years beak size and population both increased and, but Darwin’s birds were still behind Wallace island birds. But then at the 300 year both beaks and populations were almost the same increase. My hypothesis on how an increase in precipitation on Darwin will influence beak size is that the beak sizes should become smaller and more shallow because the increase in rain will make softer seeds and smaller, shallow beaks are better for soft seeds. And the bird’s population will increase.. I observed just what I hypothesized – the beaks grew smaller and their populations grew huge. When I reran the experiment I observed that Wallace island birds also followed the similar growth for beaks and population as the Darwin birds. When I ran the experiment by increasing precipitation on Wallace Island to 50 cm/year and increasing beak size to 28 mm, for 300 years, I observed the beak sized actually decreased slightly and the population stayed steady and in line with the Darwin birds. Next experiment I decreased beak size on both of the islands to an intermediate value. I decreased rainfall on one island to a value close to zero. On the other island, I increase rainfall close to the maximum value and ran the experiment for 300 years. I observed different effects on each island. On the Darwin island with a medium beak size and almost no rain had increase in beak size and population. The Wallace birds with a medium beak size and lots of rain had a decrease in beak size and a steady increase in population. Assignment 4: Effect of Island Size My hypothesis for what effect an increase in island size will have on beak size and finch populations is that the beak size will have an increase and population will increase. I began my experiment by leaving all other parameters at their default values. Then changed the island size of Darwin to the highest it could go to 1km. The beak sized increased as predicted and so did the population increased. When I decreased island size, the beak size grew and the population dropped off first in the beginning but then increased with time. Based on previous experiments if I decrease the clutch size the birds populations will decrease a great deal. Also if I decrease the heritability parameter, and decrease clutch size the populations decrease – which looked like to the point of extinction. How to cite Evolution Lab, Essay examples

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Essay basement free essay sample

Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past, the American way, is shown when he hollers at his son to drive an American vehicle in displeasure that he chose a Japanese model instead. His patriotism and experience in the Korean War leads to his racist demeanor towards the Asian community in which now composes the majority of his neighborhood. Believing that they are enemies of the state, Walt resents them, for they reminded him of his guilt of what those people have done to him in the past. The combination of the lack of respect he receives, as well as the ghost of memory’s past, causes Walt to be at war with himself and subsequently reflects it upon his relationship with others. Walt shows that when an individual is unable to deal with their own issues, one may close themselves off from the outside world with hostility to prevent having more issues arisen. basement, showing perhaps somewhat resentment and shame as well. Stored in his garage is a Ford Gran Torino vehicle in which was a reminder of his happier times in the past working at the Ford manufacturing plant. The Gran Torino, which is perfectly kept and preserved, parallels to Walt himself. Hidden, isolated, and untouched, the car represents Walt’s mentality, values, and his reluctance to accept the present and adapt to change. His desire to preserve the past,

Thursday, November 28, 2019

The Need For School-Age Care In America Essays - Criminology

The Need For School-Age Care In America The Need for School Age Care in America Since the fall of 1997 America has experienced a rapid increase in the number of school shootings. These crimes have been completely non-discriminate towards either social status or ethnicity. What these incidents do have in common is the fact that students between the ages of 10 to 16 committed them. When later interviewed, most of the students who instigated these crimes reported feeling like ?loners? or ?outcasts? within their student body and communities. It has been the direct effect of these violent acts that people across America are looking towards permanent solutions for these problems and the need for quality after-school programs has come into the national focus. Violent juvenile crime triples during the hours of 3pm and 8pm. (Fox and Newman 1997, cited by the National Institute on Out of School Time, Wellesley College- NOIST) Today experts estimate that there are over 5 million American students between the ages of 10 to 16 who return from school to an empty home. Economic necessity is the number one factor for this staggering figure followed by the lack of quality after-school programs available. Statistics show that these unsupervised students are at a greater risk to participate in drug experimentation, sex and truancy, while exhibiting lowered school performances. Children, families and communities can all benefit greatly from quality after-school programs. The majority of the time spent by unsupervised children and youth is either watching television or with peers in unsupervised activities. Quality after-school programs provide a safe, supervised environment for these young people and children. After-school programs also provide structured supervised activities, which improves the overall learning process. The students involved in quality after-school programs create more positive relationships with their peers and also with caring responsible adults with whom these students can foster lasting bonds. This in turn helps to harvest students with a higher level of self-esteem. Students that perform better in academics as well as develop stronger social skills. In his speech on the issue of childcare President Clinton said the following: ?Improving after-school care is integral to improving child care across our country? Through after-school programs we can bring parents the peace of mind that comes with knowing their children are safe. We can teach our children to say no to drugs and yes to reading, sports and computers.? (The White House at Work 1/26/99) The president also mentioned his plan to provide these services to parents who could not otherwise afford them as well as make these programs widely available to students of all ages. To follow up his ideas the President has committed a total of one billion dollars, to be allocated over the next 5 years to the enhancement of after-school programs. Although this is definitely a step in the right direction the next step is to get more people involved in the process of establishing the criteria for quality in after-school programs and then implementing these programs within their own communi ties. Advocates for gun control are crying out for stricter laws and the reform of the Second Amendment. This cause may hold true for a short-term solution regarding the immediate ?physical? danger to the students but it does not remotely begin to solve the greater problem of the emotional or social well being of these same children and youth. With more and more destructive behavior being exhibited by students today the ever-pressing need for after-school care is a matter that involves not only educators but also the nation as a whole. Establishing a safe place for children and youth to go after school will not only help to alleviate juvenile crime and deter youth violence, it will also give a greater majority of these ?high-risk? kids a chance for a brighter tomorrow. Social Issues